Tiwa Savage was featured in VIBE Magazine for the “Vibe Next” feature where they talk about artists that are blowing up.

The Roc Nation star talked to the magazine about her love for music, how it all started and why her Roc Nation deal is a huge blessing.

SEE EXCERPTS BELOW:

On how she got into music: I played trombone. Don’t ask me if I still play [laughs], but I literally picked it up because I had a crush on a boy in high school. He used to hang around with the cool kids, the musicians and dancers. Here I was: this kid fresh from Nigeria, strong accent, my mom shaved my hair off. I tried to get his attention. I went to this music teacher and said that I really wanted to do music. He looked to the corner of the room and said the trombone was the only instrument left. I picked it up, but eventually got bullied for it because it was always getting in the way on the bus. That was having the opposite effect of what I wanted because this guy’s now laughing at me instead of falling in love with me. So, I gave up and joined the choir.

Tiwa-Savage-VIBE-NEXT-5-640x960    Tiwa-Savage-VIBE-NEXT-4-640x960

Talking about her growth, Vibe Magazine says:

The song that Fantasia ended up taking out of her hands was “Collard Greens and Cornbread,” which ended up on the Barrino’s third studio album, Back to Me. From there, the rest is history. Savage would then relocate to Los Angeles, California and go on to write for the likes of Mary J. Blige, Mya, Monica and more through landed studio sessions with hit-makers like The Underdogs, James Fauntleroy, Frank Ocean and Kenny ‘Babyface’ Edmonds. She even went on to singing background vocals for “I Look To You,” one of last songs from the late and legendary Whitney Houston.

But, again, those accolades were not satisfying either. Coincidently, Savage would run into her former manager and former Interscope A&R executive Tunji “TJ Billz” Balogun, who would eventually convince her to take her talents back home and take a stab at bringing something new and fresh to the Afrobeats music scene in Nigeria. Shortly after heeding his advice, Savage released a fresh, lady anthem called “Kele Kele Love,” and indirectly contributed a spark to the rising smoke of the emerging “funky, and hyped, and energetic” Afrobeats genre of today.

Read more here.

Photo Credit: VIBE

Advertisements